Missouri Green Schools
 
 

 

Learning

Sections

 

CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT

1. Literacy Requirement - Does your school have an environmental or sustainability             (   ) Yes  (   ) No
literacy requirement?

If yes, in 100 words or less, describe the literacy requirement and how it is met:

 

Environmental literacy means that students possess the knowledge, intellectual skills, attitudes, experiences and motivations to make and act upon responsible environmental decisions as individuals and as members of their community. The requirement can be met by a specific course or components can be distributed across multiple courses. The assessment can include a paper and pencil test but it should also include at least planning for individual or community action if it is not possible for students to plan and carry out a project due to limited time and resources.

Any requirement should be consistent with Missouri’s grade level expectations for the grades in a particular school. For example, if the school is K-5, by the time students leave, they should have the knowledge, skills, attitudes, experiences and motivations appropriate for 5th graders. These can be distributed throughout the grades and learned over the course of a student’s time in school.

 

2. Lessons - To what extent are environmental and sustainability concepts integrated into the curriculum in each subject and each grade? In the table below, list each grade taught in your school. Then list at least one environmental and/or sustainability curriculum or lesson used in all classes in that grade and the specific subject standards covered (e.g. Science: geology, Math: geometry, English: technical writing, Social Studies: maps). If you need more lines, use the Table menu to add lines. If you have a grade in which no curriculum or lesson is used, put NA in the Curriculum or Lesson cell.

Grade

Curriculum or Lesson

Subjects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is not difficult to find at least one environmental lesson in each grade that is already being taught, especially in life science and earth science. However, there may be lessons in physics that deal with alternate energy sources, in social studies that deal with laws about contaminated water, in math that deal with modeling of population growth, in non-fiction writing that deal with environmental issues like Silent Spring, and even in health when discussing food quality. See the resources below for ideas. NOTE, as you collect information on what is being taught, you should also collect information on how it is assessed, how it aligns with STEM subjects and how it aligns with Green Technology and Career Paths so you can fill in 3, 4, and 5 below.

 

3. Assessments - To what extent are environmental and sustainability concepts integrated into assessments in each subject and each grade? In the table below, list each grade taught in your school. Then list at least one environmental and/or sustainability curriculum or lesson used in all classes in that grade. You can use the same list as above. In the Assessment Tool cell, put the kind of assessment used (e.g. short answer quiz, multiple choice test, essay, on-line quiz, science fair project, etc.)

Grade

Curriculum or Lesson Assessed

Assessment Tool

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check to see if the lessons listed in the previous section have assessments. These can be quizzes, written reports presentations, science fair projects, games, contests, and projects, even videos.

 

4.  STEM - To what extent are the environment and sustainability used as a context for learning STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) thinking skills and content knowledge? In the table below, list each grade taught in your school. Then list at least one environmental and/or sustainability curriculum or lesson used in all classes in that grade. You can use the same list as above. In the STEM Standard cell, put the standard addressed (e.g. critical thinking, … etc.)

Grade

Curriculum or Lesson

STEM Standard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. As you collect information on environmental lessons taught in each grade, be sure and see what STEM standards are also met.

 

5. Green Tech/Careers - To what extent are the environment and sustainability used as a context for learning green technologies and career pathways? In the table below, list each grade taught in your school. Then list at least one environmental and/or sustainability curriculum or lesson used in all classes in that grade. You can use the same list as above. In the Career Pathway cell, put the technology or career pathway addressed (e.g. solar power, wind power, recycling, green building, water quality protection, public health, wildlife management, etc.)

 

Grade

Curriculum or Lesson

Green Technology/Career Pathway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics defines green jobs as either: a) output oriented: jobs in businesses that produce goods and services that benefit the environment or conserve natural resources, or b) process oriented: jobs in which the worker’s duties involve making their establishment’s production processes more environmentally friendly or in which they reduce use of natural resources. In many cases, the green career is embedded in another field, agriculture, building, health services, public administration, transportation, etc. As you collect information on environmental lessons taught in each grade, be sure and see what career connections you can make.

 

6. A.P. Environmental Science - For schools serving grades 9-12, do you provide an                        (    ) Yes  (    ) No
A.P. Environmental Science course?

Provide the percentage of last year’s                                       Percentage scoring 3 or above:
eligible graduates who completed the
 course during their high school career

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

7. Certification - For each certification listed below, provide the number of teachers in each grade who are certified and the year certified. If needed, add additional rows as needed.

Certification

Grade (# Teachers) Year; Grade (# Teachers) Year:…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Certification programs document that an educator is knowledgeable about the entirety of a particular field, the ways to teach it (if applicable), how to acquire additional knowledge and skills in the field and the rationale behind designating the field as certification worthy. NOTE – include links to certification programs that are not already listed below.

http://projectwet.missouristate.edu– Missouri Project WET workshop facilitator certification
https://www.plt.org/trainings/- Project Learning Tree Missouri
http://projectwild.org – Project Wild
http://www.flyingwild.org/training/missouri.htm – Project Flying Wild Missouri
http://www.meea.org/certification.html– Missouri Environmental Education Certification
https://huntfish.mdc.mo.gov/hunting-trapping/hunter-education-skills-training– Missouri Hunter Education
http://www.interpnet.com/nai/Certification/nai/_certification/NAI_Certification.aspx?hkey=0c08ac07-c574-4560-940f-82fba3a22be9 – National Association for Interpretation certification
http://extension.missouri.edu/masternaturalist/training-overview.aspx – Missouri Master Naturalist Training
http://mg.missouri.edu/- Missouri Master Gardner Training

8. Workshops Attended - In the table below, list workshops in which teachers participated in the last three years. Include the number of teachers, their grades and the year of participation. Add rows as needed. Categorize the workshops using the list provided in the directions. Webinars and online course will also count.

Workshops (Category 1, 2, or 3)

Grade (# Teachers) Year; Grade (# Teachers) Year:…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Workshops don’t typically cover material in the same depth as certifications. However, they are useful for learning a new lesson idea, a particular skill, and/or about the resources in a field. Use the categories below for characterizing your workshops.

Category 1 – Curricular – hands-on, in-depth experience with a curriculum that includes human impacts on nature and ways to address them (e.g. Projects, Discover Nature Schools, NOAA curricula, etc.)

Category 2 - Outdoor Education Experiences – hands on experience with outdoor or nature skills like hunting, fishing, camping, birding, canoeing, etc. (e.g. Hunter Education, Fly Fishing Clinic, Botany Hike, etc.)

Category 3 - Conferences – multiple sessions that provide short introductions to diverse aspects of environmental, sustainability or nature education (e.g. Missouri Environmental Education Association, Science Teachers of Missouri, National Science Teachers Association, Association of Missouri Interpreters, Interface, etc.)

 

9. Workshops and Lessons Provided- In the table below, for the last three years, list workshops (title and event) given by a teacher or a lesson which they published in media widely available to the public.  For workshops provide the title, venue and estimated number of attendees. For lessons provide the title and a link. Add rows as needed.

Workshops or Lessons

# Attendees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teachers can dramatically increase the impact of environmental education by sharing their experiences and knowledge with their peers. Venues include professional conferences and in-house training in schools and districts.

 

 

OUTDOOR LEARNING EXPERIENCES
                                                                           
10. Outdoor Learning - For each grade briefly describe a meaningful outdoor experience and the subject standards to which it connects.

Grade

Outdoor Experience (Subject Standard)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A meaningful outdoor experience is one in which students engage in self-directed observation of and interaction with natural phenomena or objects, learn from that experience, and are able to share it with others through writing, drawing, recording data or speaking. It does not need to take a long time, though time is certainly helpful in establishing the habit of thoughtful observation and interaction. It can be guided by instruction, as in look here for this, but should provide mental space for the students to make their own discoveries.

These activities can set the stage: 1) collecting weather data, 2) collecting phenology data (tracking the timing of bud burst, leaf emergence, etc. 3) mapping things in the school yard, 4) learning plant identification, 5) making collections of natural objects, 6) sampling stream invertebrates, 7) learning and practicing bird calls, 8) monitoring behavior of school yard animals (birds and squirrels), 8) taking nature walks around the neighborhood at different times of year and noting changes, 9) planting a food or native plant garden and taking care of it, 10) learning outdoor skills like fire making or shelter building, 11) helping with a neighborhood cleanup, 12) doing a scavenger hunt, 13) orienteering, 14) playing in the mud…

 

11. Context & Community - Describe how outdoor learning is used to teach an array of subjects in context, engage the broader community, and develop civic skills.

In 50 words or less, provide an example from the list above of how an outdoor experience provided a context for at least two subject standards:

 

In 50 words or less, provide an example from the list above of how an outdoor experience engaged the broader community and developed civic skills (you may use the same example as above or a different one):

As outdoor learning experiences with students are planned, teachers should consider how the experience connects with two or more subjects. For example, when students gather, analyze and share data and observations they are using math and ELA, not to mention applying science concepts and analytical reasoning. 

There is also an opportunity to have students communicate their observations to their community. If their outdoor learning involves mapping neighborhood trees, wildlife, trash or other features, they can identify environmental issues, communicate them to their school or city and work together to find solutions.

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plan/my-neighborhood– Lesson Plan posted on Scholastic
http://education.usgs.gov/lessons/schoolyard/MapSketch.html– US Geological Survey mapping activity Earth Explorer
http://www.eduplace.com/ss/act/resmap.html– Eduplace resource mapping exercise.

 

 

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

12. Community Engagement - Describe students’ civic/community engagement projects integrating environment and sustainability topics.

In 100 words or less, describe students’ projects:

 

Ideally this will be a project that a class or school takes on as a joint project and it is one that the students themselves have selected. Examples include picking up trash, planting trees or native plants, removing invasive species, winterizing homes of low income residents, collecting items to pass on to new homes, training kids and families in some outdoor skill  raising awareness of a community issue like recycling, storm water management, invasive species, energy conservation, water conservation, etc.

 

13. Partnerships - Describe your partnerships to help your school and other schools achieve in the 3 Pillars. Include both the scope (the size and diversity of audiences reached) and impact (what kind of change and how much was there) of these partnerships.

In 100 words or less, describe partnerships related to the environment:

 

Partners can be businesses, non-profits, state agencies, national, state or local parks, local government, even other schools. If the school has an existing partnership, see if a shared environmental or environmental health project can be initiated if there is not already such a project.

https://mostateparks.com/find-a-park- Missouri State Parks, Find a Park in Your Area
http://missouriymcas.org/- Missouri State Alliance of YMCAs
https://www.nps.gov/state/mo/index.htm– National Park Service, parks in Missouri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_nature_centers_in_Missouri– Wikipedia list of nature centers in Missouri